Your desk - the 19th century dining table, an apron, note pad and recipes.

Your desk – the 19th century dining table, an apron, note pad and recipes.

 

Take a 5-star legendary hotel, add in a two star Michelin chef and a 19th Century kitchen, fresh ingredients, 6 eager ‘pupils’ and you have a typical Wednesday morning cooking class at La Mirande, Avignon.

Madame went off full of excitement and enthusiam to one of them. The classes did not disappoint.

On the schedule was poached eggs on a vegetable dish, how to use every part of the lamb and some samoosas. All topped off with a sumptuous meal accompanied by local wines. Heaven!

Madame, Sam and le Chef with the ingredients. Ready for action.

Madame, Sam and le Chef Michel Meissonnier with the ingredients. Ready for action.

 

Fresh and ready to go.

Fresh and ready to go.

 

The Chef describes the asparagus to a course participant - serious business.

Michel Meissonnier, The Chef describes the asparagus to a course participant – serious business.

The veggie dish

The veggie dish

 

 

 

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A Lily of the Valley starting to flower just before 1 May in the Bastide les Amis garden

 

The Symbolism of the Merguet or Lily of the Valley

At the beginning of the 20th century it became tradition in France to sell lily of the valley on international labour day, May 1, by labour organisations and private persons without paying sales tax (on that day only) as a symbol of spring. 

The flower is also known as Our Lady’s tears or Mary’s tears from Christian legends that it sprang from the weeping of the Virgin Mary during the crucifixion of Jesus. Other fables have its coming into being from Eve’s tears after she was driven with Adam from the Garden of Eden or from the blood shed by Saint Leonard of Noblac during his battles with a dragon.

The name “lily of the valley” is used in some English translations of the Bible in Song of Songs 2:1, but the Hebrew phrase “shoshannat-ha-amaqim” in the original text (literally “lily of the valleys”) does not refer to this plant. It is possible, though, that the biblical phrase may have had something to do with the origin or development of the modern plant-name.

It is a symbol of humility in religious painting. Lily of the valley is considered the sign of Christ’s second coming. The power of men to envision a better world was also attributed to the lily of the valley.

Its scientific name, majalis or maialis, means “of or belonging to May”, and old astrological books place the plant under the dominion of Mercury, since Maia, the daughter of Atlas, was the mother of Mercury or Hermes.

In the “language of flowers”, the lily of the valley signifies the return of happiness. Legend tells of the affection of a lily of the valley for a nightingale that did not come back to the woods until the flower bloomed in May.

Lily of the valley has been used in weddings, although it can be very expensive. Lily of the valley was featured in the bridal bouquet at the wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton. Lily of the valley was also the flower chosen by Princess Grace Kelly to be featured in her bridal bouquet.

And now, the lilac tree.

Lilac tree at Bastide les Amis, Luberon

Lilac tree at Bastide les Amis, Luberon

Syringa vulgaris (lilac or common lilac) is a species of flowering plant in the olive family Oleaceae, native to the Balkan Peninsula, where it grows on rocky hills. This species is widely cultivated as an ornamental and has been naturalized in other parts of Europe (UK, France, Germany, Italy, etc.) as well as much of North America. It is not regarded as an aggressive species, found in the wild in widely scattered sites, usually in the vicinity of past or present human habitations.

This time it is the turn of the rape seed.

A field of rape seed near Saint Pantaleon

A field of rape seed near Saint Pantaleon

Rapeseed (Brassica napus), also known as rape, oilseed rape, rapa, rappi, rapaseed (and, in the case of one particular group of cultivars, canola), is a bright-yellow flowering member of the family Brassicaceae (mustard or cabbage family), consumed in China as a vegetable. The name derives from the Latin for turnip, rāpa or rāpum, and is first recorded in English at the end of the 14th century. Older writers usually distinguished the turnip and rape by the adjectives ’round’ and ‘long’ (-‘rooted’), respectively.

B. napus is cultivated mainly for its oil-rich seed, the third-largest source of vegetable oil in the world.

The newest floral gems to blossom are the Wisteria. Everywhere!

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Wisteria (also spelled Wistaria or Wysteria) is a genus of flowering plants in the pea family, Fabaceae, that includes ten species of woody climbing vines native to the Eastern United States and to China, Korea, and Japan. Some species are popular ornamental plants, especially in China and Japan. An aquatic flowering plant with the common name wisteria or ‘water wisteria’ is in fact Hygrophila difformis, in the family Acanthaceae.

The botanist Thomas Nuttall said he named the genus Wisteria in memory of Dr. Caspar Wistar (1761–1818). Questioned about the spelling later, Nuttall said it was for “euphony,” but his biographer speculated that it may have something to do with Nuttall’s friend Charles Jones Wister, Sr., of Grumblethorpe, the grandson of the merchant John Wister. (Some Philadelphia sources state that the plant is named after Wister. As the spelling is apparently deliberate, there is no justification for changing the genus name under the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature. However, some spell the plant’s common name “wistaria”, and Fowler is decisively for the “wistaria” spelling.

Wisteria, especially Wisteria sinensis, is very hardy and fast-growing. It can grow in fairly poor-quality soils, but prefers fertile, moist, well-drained soil. They thrive in full sun. Wisteria can be propagated via hardwood cutting, softwood cuttings, or seed. However, specimens grown from seed can take decades to bloom; for this reason, gardeners usually grow plants that have been started from rooted cuttings or grafted cultivars known to flower well. Another reason for failure to bloom can be excessive fertilizer (particularly nitrogen). Wisteria has nitrogen fixing capability, and thus mature plants may benefit from added potassium and phosphate, but not nitrogen. Finally, wisteria can be reluctant to bloom because it has not reached maturity. Maturation may require only a few years, as in Kentucky Wisteria, or nearly twenty, as in Chinese Wisteria. Maturation can be forced by physically abusing the main trunk, root pruning, or drought stress.

A well known Wisteria in Cavaillon - in a few months time, this is huge.

A well known Wisteria in Cavaillon – in a few months time, this is huge.

Wisteria can grow into a mound when unsupported, but is at its best when allowed to clamber up a tree, pergola, wall, or other supporting structure. Whatever the case, the support must be very sturdy, because mature Wisteria can become immensely strong with heavy wrist-thick trunks and stems. These will certainly rend latticework, crush thin wooden posts, and can even strangle large trees. Wisteria allowed to grow on houses can cause damage to gutters, downspouts, and similar structures. Its pendulous racemes are best viewed from below.

Wisteria flowers develop in buds near the base of the previous year’s growth, so pruning back side shoots to the basal few buds in early spring can enhance the visibility of the flowers. If it is desired to control the size of the plant, the side shoots can be shortened to between 20 and 40 cm long in mid summer, and back to 10 to 20 cm in autumn. Once the plant is a few years old, a relatively compact, free-flowering form can be achieved by pruning off the new tendrils three times during the growing season; in June, July and August, for the northern hemisphere. The flowers of some varieties are edible, and can even be used to make wine. Others are said to be toxic. Careful identification by an expert is strongly recommended before consuming this or any wild plant.

The first poppies are out! Now to find a few poppy fields!

The first poppies are out! Now to find a few poppy fields!

Cherry blossoms with Ménerbes framed in the background

Cherry blossoms with Ménerbes framed in the background

Wisteria Spring beauty in Ménerbes

 

Wild spring flowers overlook the Luberon Valley from the Ménerbes ramparts

Wild spring flowers overlook the Luberon Valley from the Ménerbes ramparts

 

Cherry blossom time

Cherry blossom time

 

Tiny old Church on the hilltop near Ménerbes

Tiny old Church on the hilltop near Ménerbes

Top of the desirability index

Top of the desirability index

 

Vew of the Parc Gautier - an aggregation of many stalls and marquees packed with antiques and collectibles

Vew of the Parc Gautier – an aggregation of many stalls and marquees packed with antiques and collectibles

 

More of the Parc with the Music School in the background

More of the Parc with the Music School in the background

 

'Vintage' cooldrink cases - good ideas for planters

‘Vintage’ cooldrink cases – good ideas for planters

 

Bric a brac and the Michelin man

Bric a brac and the Michelin man

 

Collectibles

Collectibles

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