Here she is - a mere 850km from her new, designated home.

Here she is – a mere 850km from her new, designated home.

 

Italian stonemasons are famous the world over and, as luck would have it, a mere 500 metres from our Treviso hotel, was a stonemason’s yard, chock full of designs, creations and stone products.

Like a moth to a flame, Madame was drawn there – not once but thrice.

A well is now on the wish list….. thank goodness for Hedley’s Humpers, your go-to removal and transport company in the South of France.

Some of the incredible work in the Italian stonemason's yard.

Some of the incredible work in the Italian stonemason’s yard. Quite naturally, this made the short list.

 

 

With a grand child, we now visit the baby shops (more than usual). Check out these prices!!

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Beautiful old building – this is one of the local schools.

 

Naturally, Treviso has played a leading part in Italian history from pre-Roman times. However, ‘in the modern era’ –

During World War I, Treviso held a strategic position close to the Austrian front. Just north, the Battle of Vittorio Veneto helped turn the tide of the War. During World War II, one of several Italian concentration camps was established for Slovene and Croatian civilians from the Province of Ljubljana in Monigo, near Treviso. The camp was disbanded with the Italian capitulation in 1943.

At the end of the war, the city suffered an Allied bombing on 7 April 1944 (Good Friday). A large part of the medieval structures of the city center were destroyed—including part of the Palazzo dei Trecento, later rebuilt—causing the death of about 1,000 people.

In January 2005, a bomb enclosed in a candy egg and attributed to the so-called Italian Unabomber detonated on a Treviso street.

Street lighting - a candelabra

Street lighting – a candelabra

 

Colourful lettuce in the market

Colourful lettuce in the market

 

The architecture is stunning

The architecture is stunning

 

Locals enjoying the music at a street concert - so did we!

Locals enjoying the music at a street concert – so did we!

After an overnight stop at Savona, we took the autostrada E70 through the misty Po Valley, to Treviso.

Treviso is an attractive town in the Veneto region of north-east Italy, with a population of around 80,000. From a tourist point of view, it suffers from its proximity to glamorous Venice: Treviso’s meandering waterways and tranquil atmosphere just can’t compete with the overwhelming charms of its neighbour. In its own right, though, Treviso is a pleasant town with several attractions worthy of a day trip. It also makes a good base for exploring the area (including Venice), or for enjoying a quiet Italian break.

We stmubled across the Sunday Christmas market - an Italian Christmas vegetable is this long, different radish

We stmubled across the Sunday Christmas market – an Italian Christmas vegetable is this long, different radish

 

Impeccably cleaned mushrooms at the market

Impeccably cleaned artichokes at the market

Rebuilt and restored after Second World War bombing, the town centre is a rambling maze of streets lined with arcaded walkways. Looking up, you’ll see fragments of the painted frescoes which once decorated Treviso’s houses. The town is circled by a town wall and by waterways. Treviso markets itself as a città d’acque (water city) and although it can hardly compare with its lagoon neighbour, water is an important feature of the townscape. The river Sile runs to the south of the centre, and canals carry water around the town, lined with houses or grassy banks, weeping willows, waterwheels and little parks. The town’s defensive walls, moat and imposing gateways are still impressive sights.

Atmosphere, atmosphere

Atmosphere, atmosphere

One of Treviso’s other notable features is its comfortable air of prosperity. The town is home to the clothing empire Benetton, which has a large store behind the Palazzo dei Trecento in the town centre. Unlike Venice, this town doesn’t depend on tourism – you won’t find tacky tourist shops, silly hats or bullying tour guides, just a well-off Italian town going about its daily business.

What would an Italian market be without the olives?

What would an Italian market be without the olives?

It’s also a rugby town! Benetton Treviso play in the European Cup and are usually one of the top Italian Club sides. South African rugby supporters will remember that UCT and Western Province No8 Dugald Macdonald plied his trade with Treviso as one of the pioneering overseas player in the late 70s.

We stayed on the outskirts of Treviso in a suburb of Preganziol. We can recommend the Best Western Villa Place Hotel Bolognese.

Seen in Nice Flower Market

Seen in Nice Flower Market

Not quite in Italy, but on the way. Westopped for lunch and on a balmy Saturday afternoon, a stroll through the old city and flower market. always sublime.

Our favourite lunch or breakfast spot in the Old Nice, is Le Pain & Cie – a stone’s throw from the flower sellers. Al fresco tables and alos long tables inside give a homely atmosphere. The home bakes and sandwiches are legendary and the service tip top.

Never missed!

Madame's vegetarian sandwich

Madame’s vegetarian sandwich

Pain and Cie is a few metres from the Nice Opera House

Pain and Cie is a few metres from the Nice Opera House

Pain & Cie is at 3 Rue Louis Gassin in Nice and is open 7/7; 07h00-20h00.

Tel: 04 93 62 94 32.

Off we go…. the coffee machine is broken and there are no agents for Elektra machines in France so it seemed as good an excuse as any.

The posts over the next few days will take us to Nice, Savona, Padua, Treviso, Venice, Vincenza and back home to Ménerbes!

A top of the range elektra machine in the company showroom in Treviso. Ours is a little more modest.

A top of the range elektra machine in the company showroom in Treviso. Ours is a little more modest.

This is a 'selfie' creation - seen in Coustellet market.

This is a ‘selfie’ creation – seen in Coustellet market.

Guarding over the village is the medieval fort - now restored by the Michelin family.

Guarding over the village is the medieval fort – now restored by the Michelin family.

 

 

Take a sun-drenched terrace, superb food, the Med lapping away 15 metres from your table, great service, friends and chilled beverage – what can be better? Especially when you’re in Cassis. Le Grande Large is the spot.

We call Cassis, the “poorman’s Saint Tropez”. But, it’s not really. It is unique in its own way and many of the homeowners cannot be called ‘poor’ – for example, football supremo Michel Platini and the Michelin family.

The classic Cassi picture - houses, boats and the sea

The classic Cassis picture – houses, boats and the sea

Cassis during the summer season is busy, busy. On shoulder and off-seasons, the sun still shines, the restaurants are (mainly) open and the vibe remains. In the small fishing village, there are 96 restaurants and uncountable bars and cafes. You cannot go wrong. And, of course, Cassis is famous for its ice-cream shops and clothing boutiques (Escales to drop just one name).

My favourite - a starter of white bait and a delicious sauce.

My favourite – a starter of white bait and a delicious sauce.

Madame's starter - local mussels gratin

Madame’s starter – local mussels gratin

Our locale - smiling happily after a lovely lunch

Our locale – smiling happily after a lovely lunch

For more information on Le Grande Large, click here.

Crazy coloured cauliflowers

Crazy coloured cauliflowers

 

Flamingoes!

Flamingoes!

A decorative display

A decorative display

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